Wednesday, March 25, 2015 from 2:00 pm―3:00 pm Eastern Time

Family support 3.18.15In communities around the country, families support children and adults with a wide range of disabilities as well as seniors. Families provide emotional support and comfort, help people around the house and in daily activities, coordinate services, and figure out logistical needs. However, family members often do not have the resources and support they need.

Family Support: Tell Us What We Need To Know (FS-Need to Know) is a project that asks people like you, those providing family support, to let researchers know what topics need further exploration. In this town hall, researchers Sandy Magaña and Brian Grossman will discuss how current research is helping families, people with disabilities, and seniors around the country. After this, you will have the opportunity to ask questions and share what issues you think researchers should focus on to improve the lives of families, people with disabilities, and seniors around the country.

Join us to learn more about family support and give your opinion on what issues we should be researching!
Register for this session: https://thearc.webex.com/thearc/k2/j.php?MTID=t31b3aa5d36b6c577b513d1bb49600dc7

Captioning will be provided.

This event is sponsored by the Family Support Research and Training Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago.


About the Speakers:

Sandy Magaña, Professor, Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, researches the cultural context of families who care for persons with disabilities and mental illness and the experiences of parents who have disabilities. More recently, her research has focused on health disparities for minority caregivers and diagnosis and treatment disparities for Latino and black children with an autism spectrum disorder; and on interventions to reduce health and service disparities.

Brian R. Grossman, Assistant Professor, Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, is currently leading an effort to engage communities to identify family support research topics to be addressed by researchers. His research has focused on aging and disabilities as categories of exclusion and social policies (specifically, Medicaid home- and community-based serves and Social Security) as opportunities for (re)integration. Currently, he is working on multiple projects addressing how differences in policies across states affect the experience of users of social services, especially as they move or try to move from one state to another.